Alaska Travel Tips – What To See In Alaska, The Last Frontier

Land of glaciers, lush forests, wild rivers, seas, and fjords dotted with islands. The beauty of its landscapes impresses and its history, impregnated by the Russian legacy and the time of the gold rush, too. We tell you what to see in Alaska, a trip through the last frontier.

Alaska Travel Tips

If you are a lover of nature in its purest form, Alaska provides an unforgettable memory. In January 1959, it was the penultimate territory to become part of the United States, and today it is the largest but also the least populated. Anchorage is the city with the most significant number of inhabitants in the state, and it is estimated that it concentrates 40% of the total population.

It is a unique destination where the views leave you nailed for minutes and invites you to live the adventure. A paradise that nature has been sculpting over the centuries and has the plus of enjoying the midnight sun for those who travel in summer and the northern lights for those who decide to start the route in winter.

Here you have our selection of the natural places that you should not miss and the locations that will allow you to know the history of this barren land but of incredible beauty. To find out what to see in Alaska, follow these clues.

ALASKA NATIONAL PARKS

DENALI NATIONAL PARK

One of Alaska’s top attractions is the towering granite towers and snow-capped peaks of Denali National Park and Preserve, often lost in the clouds. On the horizon rises Mount Denali, which in 2015 while President Barack Obama recovered this denomination claimed by the natives in the last four decades. At 6,194 meters, it is the highest peak in North America and considered sacred by the native inhabitants.

But this park is also home to different species of mammals, such as the unique moose and a place from which to spot birds, including the impressive golden eagle. In addition, it allows you to see caribou, wolves, and bears roaming freely in their natural habitat.

WRANGELL-SAINT ELIAS NATIONAL PARK

The views take the visitor’s breath away. Four large mountain ranges converge in this park, and within its borders are nine of the 16 highest peaks in the country, such as Mount San Elías and Logan. A wild, mountainous and rugged terrain, little-visited despite its spectacular nature.

It is also possible to see some herds of bison and black and brown bears walking through the park.

KENAI FJORDS NATIONAL PARK

It was created in 1980 to protect this glacier paradise at the foot of the town of Seward. Snow and ice cover much of the park. 

Observing its great glaciers that flow from the high mountains to the sea, surrounded by green forests that reach the waves, is an impressive sight. Glacier cruise tours allow you to view sea otters, Steller’s sea lions, harbor seals, and Dall’s porpoises, killer whales, dwarf, humpback, and fin whales from the deck. 

If you are an adventurous traveler, the coastal fjords are a kayak lover’s dream, who can use a boat to pick them up and go.

The Yukon River runs on the border between Alaska and Canada, which gives its name to a little-explored Canadian region that has remained unchanged over time. Our proposal to discover what to see in Alaska includes this place that rose to fame in 1898 during the so-called ‘gold rush’ and which was the destination of the more than 40,000 prospectors who started their route from Alaskan lands.

In August 1896, three gold prospectors George Carmack, Skookum Jim, and Tagish Charlie, found a vein in a tributary of the Klondike River called Bonanza Creek. In this part of Alaska, near the Canadian city of Dawson, the most significant ‘gold rush’ in history began. The adventurers set off from Skagway (now in the United States) to Dawson, traversing more than 500 miles of wilderness on foot and by canoe searching for the precious metal.

The image of an endless line of long-suffering porters traversing the snow-covered Chilkoot Pass (now a national monument of the United States and Canada) is part of the visual memory of every adventurer who has dreamed of Alaska. There are hundreds of books and films on the gold feat, and the Yukon River is an old acquaintance of all believers in the “great North.” In the Yukon Territory, period buildings can still be seen standing along the route, and the spirit of the gold rush seems to be still present.

KLONDIKE NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK

It is the most popular in Alaska and offers a unique balance of history and outdoor adventure. The streets of the town of Skagway are lined with restored historic buildings such as shops and canteens that take you back to the time. Neighboring Dyea, which disappeared in the years after the gold rush, is the starting point for the famous Chilkoot Trail.

Alaska Travel Tips : Historic Cities

FAIRBANKS

To the north of Denali is the city of Fairbanks, famous for being the first to which the gold prospectors of this state went and where you can visit the Gold Dredgue No. 8 mines to learn about the extraction process and even try your luck with the pan. A visit to the thermal pools of Chena Hot Springs is also recommended, and when leaving the city to the south, a stop that pleases the elderly and the little ones is imposed: the house of Santa Claus.

TALKEETNA

An essential visit for fans of the mythical series of the 1990 Doctor in Alaska. It is said that this town served as inspiration for the fictional community of Cicely, and, of course, a walk through its streets translates into the setting in which the episodes took place.

SEWARD

A fishing village with hardly any houses, restaurants, fishing agencies, and port known for halibut and salmon fishing in saltwater. Located in a lovely setting, it is famous for its Independence Day celebration, the exhibitions of its Marine Life Center, the aquarium, and the gateway to the Kenai Fjords National Park.

OTHER PLACES

Juneau, the capital of Alaska, is only accessible by plane or boat. They say it is the most beautiful city in the state and its hiking trails are famous.

Tok is a roadside town in Canada and is known for being the capital of dogsledding.

Barrow, Alaska’s northernmost place on the Arctic Circle, is where the Inuit Eskimo community sits.

Anchorage is the largest city with great cultural life. Possibly, it is one of the few cities in the world where it is not strange to come across a moose when crossing the street.

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